• A Unique Approach

    We offer the best of British and Vietnamese education.

    BVIS Hanoi Students Primary Our School

  • Developing future leaders today

    Our students are confident, creative and compassionate, and ready to be the leaders of the future.

    BVIS Hanoi Students

  • Inspiring Your Child

    Our staff are dedicated to knowing every child well and adapting the teaching approach to ensure all can be successful.

    BVIS Hanoi Staff

  • Setting hearts alight for learning

    Our curriculum is designed to give children the tools to learn and ability to succeed in Vietnam and Overseas.

    BVIS Hanoi Curriculum

  • Start your journey with us

    Essential information so that you are never out of touch.

    BVIS Hanoi Admissions

  • Every Day is Precious

    Every day there's something new and exciting instore.

    BVIS Hanoi News & Blogs

The whole Primary School enjoyed Pi day

Last Saturday was World Pi Day and this one was a particularly special calendar date,  as you will see in a moment.

  • BVIS Hanoi Pi Day (4)
  • BVIS Hanoi Pi Day (5)
  • BVIS Hanoi Pi Day (3)
  • BVIS Hanoi Pi Day (2)
  • BVIS Hanoi Pi Day (1)

Pi, or the Greek symbol π, is a number found when you divide the circumference of a circle, the distance around the edge, with the diameter of a circle, the distance across its middle. The resulting number is just over 3 and its first digits are 3.1415, hence March 14th 2015 or 31415 being a special date. The digits go on and on with no pattern.  π has been calculated to well over a million decimal places and still there is no pattern to the digits! Over the next 2 weeks, our children have been challenged to remember the highest number of digits of Pi and then recite them in a House competition. So far a Year 4 child is leading with over 200 digits, the sequence starts 3.14159265358979323846… and it goes on.

This competition was launched on Monday when the whole Primary School enjoyed Pi day. There were mathematical challenges set in all classes, a maths trail around school where children followed clues and answered mathematical questions to complete it and the different year groups also created mathematical art work. Y1 and Y2 based their work on that of Mondrian using geometric shapes, lines and colour.  Y3 and Y4 used Kandinsky showing perfect symmetry of a circle using chalk pastels. Finally, Y5 and 6 were inspired by Escher, a graphic artist who used shape, pattern, tessellation and reflection with pencil and ink. These will be displayed around school when complete; they look amazing.

Share this page:

Share