• A global education

    We are a Nord Anglia Education school, with 42 sister schools around the world

    2 senior girls

  • Did you know?

    Our average class size is 13 students, meaning every student gets the support they need to achieve highly

    little girl

  • Serious about students' futures

    Our graduating students go on to the best universities in the UK, US, Europe and Asia

    senior student

  • We love languages

    Students can study Spanish, French, German and Czech from Year 3 upwards

    Year 2 student

  • Academic excellence

    In 2016 Our highest IB Diploma student gained 44 points putting them into the top 1% of students worldwide.

    music

  • Did you know?

    Our Parent School Partnership runs events every term, forming a core part of the school's social calendar

    news

  • Did you know?

    We have been established in the Czech Republic for more than 20 years

    primary boy

Preparing to Move

A few things to consider before the move

Administrative preparations

You’ll find plenty of international moving companies that can help smooth your transition to Prague. In fact, many of these companies work specifically with expat families and even offer culture orientation seminars for the whole family. Search for moving companies on Prague’s biggest expat portal, www.expats.cz. When deciding what to bring, bear in mind that electronics and clothing are generally more expensive in the Czech Republic.

 

Visas and documents

Obtaining visas for your entire family will take time, so you need to start this process as early as possible. Visa requirements differ depending on your country of origin and the length and purpose of your stay. You must contact the closest Czech consulate or embassy in your country for up-to-

date information. However, your employer may also provide you with assistance in the visa process. The main difference in visa requirements is between EU and non-EU citizens: non-EU citizens require long-term visas for a period of stay longer than three months.

 

EU citizens

EU citizens do not require a long-term visa to visit or stay in the Czech Republic over 90 days. EU citizens can find information on residency requirements here: http://magistrat.praha-mesto.cz/75523_Information-about-Residency-for-Citizens-of-the-European-Union-and-Their-Family-Members-in-the-Czech-Republic%29

 

Non-EU citizens

As the Czech Republic is now part of the Schengen Area (which includes most EU nations as well as Switzerland, though not the UK or Ireland), non-EU citizens without a long-term visa can only stay within the Czech Republic for up to 90 days within a 6-month period. After that, they must leave not only the Czech Republic but the entire Schengen Area for another 90 days before being allowed to return.

The documents submitted for a long-term visa depend on the very important “Reason for long-term stay in the Czech Republic”. Is it for a job or self-employment? Then you need a work permit or trade licence

first. Is it to study? Then you need a university admissions letter. Is it for family reunification? Then you need a marriage certificate. Detailed visa information, in English, can be found on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic website: www.mzv.cz/jnp/en/information_for_aliens/frequently_asked_questions/index.html   

 

If you know at least 4-6 months in advance that you’ll be staying long-term in Prague, you can apply for your family’s visas at the Czech embassy in your home country (recommended). Otherwise, once you arrive in the Czech Republic you can make an appointment and submit your translated, notarised documents to the nearest Czech embassy or consulate outside the country (Dresden, Bratislava – highly recommended for very friendly service – or Vienna), and then wait for approximately 2 to 4 months.

Once your visa is ready, you must bring proof of medical insurance (valid for the length of your visa) with you when you pick it up. You can find detailed information on insurance requirements and the list of approved insurance companies here: www.mzv.cz/jnp/en/information_for_aliens/general_visa_information/travel_medical_insurance.html

 

Check the following websites for updated procedures and regulations:

• British citizens: http://ukinczechrepublic.fco.gov.uk/en

• American citizens: http://prague.usembassy.gov

• Canadian citizens: www.canadainternational.gc.ca/czech-tcheque/index.aspx

 

If you’re moving to Prague as a family, you must be prepared to provide your child’s previous school records and birth certificate. Contact your child’s current and previous schools as soon as possible to get the process moving. Even if you’re not going to enrol them in school, bringing at least a copy of each family member’s birth certificates and medical records and prescriptions is a good idea. Here is a list of documents to bring for a longterm stay in Prague:

• Passport (plus several copies of first page of passport) and visa

• Extra passport-size photos (however, Czech documents will require smaller, Czech-size passport photos which can be taken at any photo shop in Prague)

• Children’s birth certificates (copy for adults)

• Marriage certificate

• Children’s school records

• Diploma and CV (for applying for work permit)

• Driving licence (to apply for international driving licence)

• Inventory of everything shipped

• Medical records, prescriptions

Share this page:

Share