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What a Fantastic Week in Year Three!

Year 3 have had fun this week with practical activities designed to support their learning.

  • Year 3 Students
  • Year 3 Learning
  • Year 3 Learning
  • Year 3 Learning
 
As part of their Active Plane topic, Parrots, Puffins and Toucans learnt about what causes an earthquake and they are able to explain this using geographical language (tectonic plates and seismic waves).  They then became engineers to investigate structures that would withstand an earthquake and reduce the devastation caused.  After designing their structures, they used simple materials – marshmallows, toothpicks and kebab sticks – to build them.  Their structures were then put to the test as they were placed onto a tray of jelly which was shaken to simulate the tremors from an earthquake.  They found out that earthquake-proof buildings typically have cross bracing that forms triangles in its design (like a bridge).  Such buildings usually have a large ‘footprint’ or base. Short buildings are more earthquake proof than tall ones.
 
‘What bones form our skeleton?’ was the question Year 3 were asked in Science this week.  The children started by drawing around themselves and then putting inside the outline what they already knew about the bones which formed their skeleton.  Once they had shared their existing knowledge, they used the ‘Essential Skeleton 4’ app to investigate the bones which form their skeleton and researched their scientific names.  Did you know that of the 206 bones in an adult body, over half of these bones are in the hands, which have 54 bones, and the feet, which have 52 bones?
 
By Zoe Hubbard