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Reception are Learning to Read Music

An important part of children’s understanding of the musical world is learning the concept that music can be written and read in the form of patterns of notes. 

  • Music Lesson in Reception
  • Music Lesson in Reception
  • Music Lesson in Reception
  • Music Lesson in Reception
  • Music Lesson in Reception

The challenge for teaching children of a young age is finding a way to introduce children to reading music which is both fun and engaging. 

This term children have learned many different ways that symbols can be used to represent the different elements of music. Children have been learning to read a very simple musical stave with only two pitches: high and low. They read and perform scores on two chimes (a high and a low one). This familiarises children to lines and spaces on a full musical stave and the idea that where the note is on the stave relates directly to the pitch of the note. 

This week children have been introduced to simple rhythmic notation. The spoken word is the most accessible way that they can access the idea of rhythm, so they have been learning to use syllables in words to represent a rhythmic pattern. (The word “grasshopper” can be clapped out and learned as one long note then two short notes. )

The children loved using their own names to create their own patterns, and were able to compose and perform their own rhythmic pieces of music using pictures of themselves and their classmates.

 

By Henry Charlesworth