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  • Truly International

    We have students from over 50 different countries at our school, making us a truly international family.

    British International School Bratislava - Truly International

  • Inspiring and Passionate

    Dedicated, motivated and highly professional, all of our staff at The British International School Bratislava are here to ensure that every child thrives.

    British International School Bratislava - Dedicated staff

  • Excellence & Achievement

    Learning at BISB focuses on academic rigour and achieving great results but also on developing individualised skills and talents, enabling students to be successful in all areas of learning.

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  • High Quality Learning

    Our passion is education. We help to prepare young people of all ages to embrace the challenges that life brings and the international global society in which their future lie.

    British International School Bratislava - Start your journey

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    We are proud of our growing family of parents, teachers and socially-confident students. We’d love to welcome you too!

    British International School Bratislava

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    We enrich your child’s learning experience with opportunities beyond the ordinary.

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  • Did you know?

    You can still purchase the BISB cookbook made by our wonderful PTA.

    cookbook

Tanzania 2019

Tanzania expedition 2019

On 16th January, very early in the morning, 30 enthusiastic students said farewell to their sleepy parents, and along with 3 members of staff they headed to Vienna International airport to catch the flight to Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. 

Having our first flight to Amsterdam delayed due to a lost luggage, we made good use of our orientation skills and sprinted with our hand luggage in Schiphol airport, where we had to transfer across the airport and catch our flight in about 20 minutes. 

The students and staff were clearly in good shape because we made it. However, 2 of our bags did not! One of them extended its stay in Amsterdam for another day, and the other took a small day trip to Turkey instead. 

Upon our arrival the buses were waiting for us and just after midnight local time we arrived at Shamba Kipara Camp. After a very short welcome and briefing about the program for the next 2 days’ we headed to our tents for a very short nights’ sleep.

The students were split into two groups, and along with the other 80 students from Prague, Warsaw, Al Khor and Hanoi, completed their scheduled program while they had the opportunity to get to know each other. 

We had the fantastic opportunity to visit and camp at the Tarangile National Park for 2 days and observe the wild animals in their natural habitat, which at times felt like being part of a documentary on National Geographic Channel! It was so beautiful, so diverse, and so surreal. The large variety of wildlife, with their hierarchy and hunting instincts, were at times rough, but stunning too.

The authenticity of the park was underlined by the number of scattered Maasai settlements, with locals dressed in their traditional dress looking after herds of kettle. 

The next stage of our mission was to learn more about permaculture from a local farmer. It may or may not have been just coincidence, but what we were to study from Mr. Kitomari,he had learnt at an Agricultural college that had been set up by Polish refugees who fled from Europe during WW1 and WW2. The community of refugees still exists and was located only 18 minutes’ drive from our base camp. Mr.Kitomarihas proudly shown us, how from even very little resources one can create a farm that is self-sufficient. His knowledge about irrigation, keyhole gardens, use of animal droppings to produce gas and manure, and the combination of plants that would support each other in growing, was spectacular and has inspired many of us to bring some of the ideas we have seen back to school. 

Equipped with knowledge and eager to start to work, we went to Nazareti, a remote settlement with a state school that provides education for about 2-300 primary and middle school students, where we were about to set up a garden. The lunches for students are cooked by parent volunteers from the resources that other parents donate. By having its own garden, the school will be able to grow its own vegetables, so that the burden of food donations will become less; the likelihood of parents then sending their children to school because of that free food each day should increase. 

  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019
  • Tanzania 2019

With enthusiasm and determination to do an excellent job, we picked up our shovels, rakes, hoes, wheelbarrows and pick axes, and in less than 2 days turned a hard, unfertile piece of land full of rocks, dirt and trash into a garden full of seedbeds which awaited the vegetables to be planted. And we still had time left for a hike (with some of us completing the #waterfall challenge!), to build some keyhole gardens and plant some vegetables for the local farmers, and time to play with the children from Nazareti school during their lunch break some games.

We had a great time in Tanzania, making some new friendships, and learning a lot from what we have seen and heard while working on the local projects. We have seen the impact that our work and the work of all the other student volunteers before us has made to Nazareti school, such as the new water reservoirs, the new school wing, the accommodation quarters, the solar panels and now the new garden that the school has got. We have also understood how poverty influences education and how education, or rather the lack of it, can impact upon the whole of society as well as individuals’ lives. We felt very thankful for all the meals we had, the school, and the opportunities we have to grow without having to worry about the elementary things such as food or shelter. 

On our last day in Tanzania, we said our thank you’s to all the local members of staff for looking after us, the school that enabled this trip to happen, and the parents, who very rightly saw the value of such an experience for us all.