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The Differences Between British and American English

28 October 2015

From the team at Cambridge English Language Assessment [the people who produce the Young Learner English programme we use at BISS Puxi] comes this interesting explanation of the differences in American and British English. 

 

At BISS Puxi, we have a diverse range of teachers with different backgrounds. Within the EAL department we have some British, American, Australian and Canadian teachers and so between us we have a good understanding of all the differences in English between North America, Oceania, and the UK. We think it’s important the students understand the small differences that there are because often they will come into contact with native or near native  speakers from New Zealand, South Africa, India, Jamaica, and of course the UK, USA, Canada among others. Teaching or at least highlighting to students that there are different ways to say certain things [and doing so without favouring one or the other] gives our students a wider understanding of the Anglophone world.

I hope it answers some of your questions related to this.

James Carson, Head of EAL.