We use cookies to improve your online experience. To learn more please refer to ourWebsite Privacy and Cookie Policy.

Sorry but this form will not work without cookies enabled. Please adjust your browser settings to enable cookies to continue. For more information on how to do this please see ourWebsite Privacy and Cookie Policy.

  • Excellence for all

    We provide a learning environment that fosters achievement and excellence

    nav-promo-8

  • Confident and motivated learners

    ISM students have the aspirations and self-belief to fulfil their own potential

    nav-promo-2

  • Highly dedicated teachers

    Our teachers are dedicated to providing the best learning experience for our students

    ISMmain051

  • Bringing out the best

    We provide excellence in both academic and personal development

    bring out the best

  • Intrigued to know more?

    Read our latest news and blogs to get a better insight into life at ISM

    nav-promo-3

  • We’re here to help

    Our Admissions team are here to guide you through the process

    Admissions Team

  • Reach out to us

    Contact us today to start your learning journey at ISM

    Reach Out

With this in mind, I encourage you as parents to have some fun creating family traditions of your own.

The Importance of Holiday Traditions

Justin Noack
Justin Noack (19 posts) Head of Lower Campus View Profile

From enjoying a Christmas roast to setting off sparklers, decorating a tree or leaving treats for Santa, each family has their own interpretation of the cheerful traditions that make this time of year special. 

These seemingly simple moments may sometimes seem like frivolous fun – and there is certainly nothing wrong with that – but they can actually hold tremendous meaning for children and support their healthy development.

Attachment theory is the dominant approach psychologists use to understand the social development of young children. In straightforward terms, children's healthy development depends heavily upon the strength and security of their attachment to their parents and caregivers. The stronger the attachment, the more secure their foundation for healthy development and success.

Toys and gifts may seem colourful and attractive, but the holiday memories your child will cherish the most are with you.

To be absolutely clear, this attachment is best developed between parents and children on a consistent basis throughout the year. Daily acts of care, expressions of love and acceptance and daily time spent listening and playing are the most important ways we can build this relationship.

Even so, shared holidays offer us much more time than usual to spend in the company of our children. Although we all need time to recover from the rigours of our working lives, this time should be considered a very special resource to be spent together as much as possible. This way, it can have a rejuvenating effect on our family bonds.

I encourage you as parents to have some fun creating family traditions of your own.

Toys and gifts may seem colourful and attractive, but the holiday memories your child will cherish the most are those where they spend time in your company, with your full attention. With this in mind, I encourage you as parents to have some fun creating family traditions of your own. The joyful memories you create will give your children strong, reassuring evidence of their connection with you, which you can re-affirm with them throughout the year.

Remember, traditions that bring families together build heart-warming memories that last a lifetime – and not only for the children.

To our school family, one and all, I wish you a safe and joyful holiday season.

Ideas for Family Holiday Traditions

  • Work as a family in the kitchen to bake holiday treats or prepare special meals together.
  • Set out special candles and table decorations for meals.
  • Buy plain gingerbread shapes and use coloured icing to decorate them together.
  • Go on a shopping trip and involve the children in choosing decorations for a tree.
  • Take turns finding gifts under the tree for other family members and give them out.
  • Hide chocolates or gingerbread in the tree for children to find.
  • Wear special Christmas clothing around the house, such as Santa hats, themed pyjamas or Christmas sweaters.
  • Stay active in winter - try skiing together on some local hills or visit an outdoor skate park. Even if you're just a beginner, lessons together can be fun.
  • Play with the presents all together or start a family board game tradition.
  • Set off some sparklers outside in the snow
  • Build a snowman together
  • Make some Christmas cards for each other using craft materials.
  • Write letters to Santa (great for gift ideas).
  • Do an Advent Calendar together, with treats, puzzles or challenges.
  • Leave out treats for Santa and his reindeer.
  • Ask the children about their own ideas for family traditions!